Guitar exercises and licks and shit

The good old pentatonic scale and how to apply some different ideas.

So, I’m pretty sure you all are already familiar with the pentatonic scale, as it usually is the first scale any guitar player (or at least any rock guitarist) learns. It’s a very nice, easy to use scale for soloing, but it can get pretty boring pretty damn fast, and if you are only using the basic pentatonic boxes it can be pretty damn hard to shred on as well, unless you have a god-like right hand technique or you are Zakk Wylde. Or both.

So, let’s see what we can do with it shall we?

Here we have our basic E-minor pentatonic “box” shape on the 12th fret:




Probably the most used scale and box in all of rock soloing :)

Here we have the same pentatonic scale but starting on the minor 3rd, played on the 15th position:




You are probably familiar with this “box” as well.

NOW, at least my right hand technique doesn’t really allow me to blast through these shapes at warp speed, which -let’s face it- is shitloads of fun sometimes. So, how do we make this more “shred-friendly”?

I’ve talked about 3-note per string playing before, and to quite an extent if I recall correctly. It is a huge part of my playing, and I know I’m not the only one. I just always found it a bit hard to apply to the basic pentatonic scale, as it will have pretty huge stretches and position shifts. Here’s something in A-minor to demonstrate what I mean: It’s pretty cool and doable, but not the easiest or the most interesting way to do it:




Now lately I have been dabbling with the subject and trying out some (for me) new approaches. If we were to combine the pentatonic boxes on the 12th and 15th positions that I showed earlier it would look like this:




You’ll notice that there are same notes repeating when changing the string while ascending or descending when using this shape. Now, I used to think of this as a problem, but recently while trying to work out a new kind of approach to the pentatonic scale and shapes I have started to realise that this is actually not a problem, but an opportunity: By utilising these combined box shapes we can come up with cool new runs and ideas that are a bit different from what you’d probably do if using just one of the boxes.

Here’s a simple descending pattern using the aforementioned combination of the two pentatonic boxes:


If you try playing this at a reasonable speed you’ll hear that the repeating notes don’t actually pose a problem at all, but actually add a nice twist to the otherwise run-of-the-mill pattern.

Here’s the same idea, but here we will first asked and then descent:


Now, so far we have just been playing the scale up and down, up and down, like boobs on a bus. But you can, and SHOULD, try to incorporate different kinds of patterns and sequences to ry and make things more interesting. Here’s one to get you started. It’s an eight note pattern using to strings at a time, and then we move the same pattern up, up again, and the same idea back down. Like this:


Ookey, I’m pretty sure you catch my drift here. So, let’s spice things up a bit shall we?

What if we want to utilise this 2 boxes combined- idea, but don’t want to have those pesky repeating notes? Well, here’s a concept I’ve been working on recently. For a lack of a better term I call it 3-1-3-1 and it goes like this, in D-minor:


As you can see if you analyse the tablature, the name comes from the concept that we play our basic three notes per string, on the next string we only play one note, then three again, and then one again.
The beauty of this is that while we are still staying in one position, by using the bigger stretched and this pattern of strings we can actually play the straight forward pentatonic scale, and we can do it by using our traditional alternate picking, or if you’re into it you can also utilise economy picking.

You can also use this concept to throw in the occasional flatted fifth for that bluesier tone, if you feel like it:



We can also still expand on the concept with different patterns, such as this one here:


You’ll notice that the previous example uses quintuplets, a bit more unorthodox way of dividing the notes of the pattern than your traditional 8ths or 16ths or triplets. It just flows better with the pattern and makes it a bit more interesting I think.

So, there you have it, my recent musings on the pentatonic scale and how to expand from the traditional box shapes. I shall leave you with a lick that is basically combining most of the ideas presented before so you can get an idea what can be done when you utilise all these concepts in your playing: There's the fingerings I use displayed on top, in case you're having issues figuring out how the position transitions go.





Stay tuned for another instalment of my incoherent ramblings about the wonderful world of guitar playing. Knowing me it should be online in a few years or so :)





EXERCISES TO BUILD TECHNIQUE:

Now be warned, these are not very musical exercises, nor are they particularly fun to play, but if you are just starting to learn how to shred and shit, or if you just want to maintain your chops, these will work. Boring as hell though.

Start slowly, play the exercises up to the 12th fret or so and then back down to the first position. If your hand is tired let it rest for a while, then set your metronome around 3 clicks faster and repeat the procedure. Rinse and repeat. Rinse and repeat. Don't fool yourself by trying to play faster than you actually can, you're only cheating yourself and if you stick with the program the results will come. Kinda like going to the gym or jogging or whatnot.

Chromatic exercise and permutations:

So, first get and set your metronome. Really, I mean it. GET A METRONOME. None of these will do you that much good if you don't learn to play them clean and precisely. Set it up to a tempo that suits you, rather too slow than too fast to begin with, and then just start grinding this shit. There are numerous permutations of these exercises, and you can also come up with your own. 

Here's the most basic chromatic exercise to build up your left and right hand technique:



Notice that it is alternate picking all the way through. As I said before, and I WILL drill this into your skull even if it is the last thing I do: USE A METRONOME AND START SLOW! Play the exercise all the way up to twelfth position, or even higher if you feel like it, and then descent back to the first position.

This exercise is the first permutation, respectively ascending 1-2-3-4 and descending 4-3-2-1. Below I've listed all the permutations, so you can start to expand and don't get just the 1-2-3-4 thing into your muscle memory. I know, boring as hell, but this is workout you know :)

1-2-3-4      2-1-4-3      3-1-2-4      4-1-2-3 
1-2-4-3      2-1-3-4      3-1-4-2      4-1-3-2 
1-3-4-2      2-3-1-4      3-2-1-4      4-2-1-3
1-3-2-4      2-3-4-1      3-2-4-1      4-2-3-1
1-4-2-3      2-4-1-3      3-4-2-1      4-3-1-2

3-Note per string exercise:

And here would be a 3-note per string chromatic exercise, I did not transcribe the most simple 1-2-3 one, as it is reaaally boring, so here's one that alternates between permutations. Please note that each finger of your fretting hand is assigned a specific fret, so that you always stay on the first position, until changing to second position on the bar 5. Again, do the whole lenghty craw crawl up to the twelfth fret and then descent back to square one:

AND USE A FUCKING METRONOME!:)

An example of alternate picking in a context of an actual song:

Disclaimer: I don't remember if the song is actually 170bpm, but it's up there somewhere. The original demo was 184bpm, but that was just sick:) 

Another example:


(Disclaimer: Again, not sure about the actual tempo on the album, and too lazy to check:)

As-per-requested, here's a part from "Morpheus in a Masquerade". I don't know where this should go regarding the guitar techniques, so I'll just add it here:




STRING-SKIPPING:

String skipping does not mean that you ladies should stop wearing your G-strings, noooo way:) In this context string skipping is a playing a passage that does not continue on the adjacent string, which is usually the case. With string skipping we can achieve wider, more unorthodox intervals when soloing, or writing a melody. It also is a very efficient way of playing arpeggios, especially if you are bored with sweep-picking the normal triads, or just want to dwell more into the zone of extended arpeggios by adding 7th (which jazz guys don't even consider an extended arpeggio yet, I know...), 9th, 11th, 13th etc.

I learned most of my string skipping stuff from listening and studying Paul Gilbert and John Petrucci. I'm sure there's ton of other guys doing great shit with this as well, but that's where I got most of it, so if this stuff looks and sounds a bit (or a lot) like them, there is a reason for it.

Let's start with the very basics. Here's a descending pentatonic line that sounds, well, pretty bland:


Now here's the same scale, but this time we involve some very basic string skipping. Notice how it immediately starts to sound more fresh, not only playing a descending scale anymore, even though the basic concept is very similar:



String skipping arpeggios:

Here's an illustration of the basic concept, now just to give you a more practical and musical exercise, here's an excerpt of Pachelbel's Canon:


If you go alternate picking all the way it's a good picking exercise as well.

Here's a lick by Paul Gilbert, saw him use this one or something similar during his solo with Mr.Big in the late 80's/early 90's. The concept is very similar to that of the Canon:


Oh yeah, forgot to mention... USE A FUCKING METRONOME :)

String skipping extended arpeggios:

Here's a string skipping version of an Em7 arpeggio, this time a legato version. It requires some stretching, but sounds really cool. I use this a lot myself:


Here's an extended version of the previous one, this time an Em9 arpeggio. I add the 9th (F#) by tapping with the index finger of my right hand, then sliding the tapping hand to G (the 3rd) and back to F#:



SWEEP-PICKING:

If you don't know what sweep-picking is then I suggest you look it up, Google is your friend here:)

Here I've transcribed a sweep-picking part from a demonstration I did for Young Guitar back in the day, you can find a video of the demonstration here. This part starts at 1:36 on the video.



SILVER TONGUE HARMONISED SOLO PART:

Here's the harmonised solo part from Sonata Arctica's "Silver Tongue" from the Winterheart's Guild album. I thought this might be an interesting piece to transcribe for you, as even though it is not overtly difficult it does utilize a lot of the techniques already discussed here, and also if you analyse the harmony you will notice that it's not just straight 3rds, or "homoterssi" as we say here, but alternates between a bunch of different harmonies. I've transcribed both guitar parts, so you can play either one or maybe find a friend who can play the harmony part. Whatever floats your boat :) 




BLINDED NO MORE SOLO:

Someone asked about this, so I thought I'd transcribe it for the hell of it. Now that I've gone through the solo I have to say, even though it has some interesting ideas here and there, it's not one of my favorites. But if you get something out of it, more power to you. Anyway, here you go folks:










More to follow...

94 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. (Quote)I can't really help with the SA songs, just pick them up by ear, they're really not that difficult :) Alternate picking is a matter of practice, I'll try and cover some of that in the post.
    (/quote)

    Anyways I'm not experienced learning by ear, and really, I'm self-taught and I'm learning right now. Just one year of experience playing the guitar at the moment. I was asking for kind of stuff that I love how you play it and I'm glad to cover these songs. So here are my doubts: Here's the video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bk1JdgtrhGE&feature=related 43:23 - 43:47 (Hard by ear because of overdrive)44:13 - 44:23 (I think is like 6/6/4 in E B G respectively and then up up up down? That doesn't sound good in my guitar) and last 1:02:27 - 1:03:00 I MUST SAY THAT I LOVE THAT PART BECAUSE YOU PUT ALL YOUR FEELING! Really, I want to cover them. If I'm successful I'll devote them to you! ^^

    Cheers :-)

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  3. Jani,quick question! Is the 3 note per string exercise an odd time signature? Because it's kinda confusing playing it with a metronome and i decided not to use an accent on the metronome,what do you think about that?

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    1. No, it's 4/4 signature, triplets. if it's weird for you try googling it, I think other people can explain triplets better than I can. Basically it's 3 notes per beat, but really, google it.

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    2. When you're playing eighth-note triplets you should be playing three notes per click of your metronome. You can count it out loud ONE-and-a-TWO-and-a-THREE-and-a-FOUR-and-a and then start over on one again. The numbers should fall on the click.

      Odd time is basically any time signature with an odd amount of measures. 3/4 and 5/4 for example.

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  4. Luis (Pickboy from Barcelona)August 16, 2012 at 2:16 AM

    Great ! Just what I wanted :) ! Many thanks Jani!

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  5. I'm currently on a vacation and I don't have the guitar with me (for at least a couple of months), BUT I do have an acoustic one. Do you think it would be worth while doing theses exercises on acoustic guitar? It's a bit harder playing since I have to really press the fret hard and I don't know if it will do any good for my electric guitar playing.

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    1. Absolutely.. Just think how easy it will be once you have your electric guitar back!!

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    2. Of course it will do you good. These are mainly exercises to build up technique and strenght, they are probably very pretty heavy to do on the acoustic, but as the previous guy mentioned, after you go back to electric it will be a breeze :)

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  6. Hoping to see some of your favorite licks in there. I always admired the way you end your phrases with such creativity each and every time. Really makes your shredding fresh sounding!

    Cheers from Canada

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  7. thanks Jani, for taking the time to do this for us !

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  8. Hey Jani,is there a possibility that you could actually upload a video of you demonstrating some exercises?

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  9. Hello, Jani, could you make a lesson about sweep picking? :)

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    1. I will, wouldn't call it a lesson, but I'll explain some of the crap and show some shit I've done in the past :)

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  10. Luis (Pickboy from Barcelona)August 18, 2012 at 1:44 AM

    I have been this days practicing your tabs WITH metronome. I never used metronome (just in demo recordings), and for sure I see the difference. Sometimes my fingers dance a bit where don't have to cause I don't have the habit of using the metronome. That's the typical "bad habit" I think. I'm in fear to get stuck in my bad habit. Normally using metronome and doing things good, the habits get well corrected, isn't it?

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  11. Luis (Pickboy From Barcelona)August 18, 2012 at 5:56 PM

    Btw, at least me, dont know a flying fuck about amp configs. Do you recomend one to practice? Because sometimes the config we set makes a shitty sound that for example, arent good to do harmonics. Or sounds too much when you jump the strings. Dunno.
    And, are recommended to practice all permutations at time? Or we just need to waiy until the next permutation? Thanks Jani

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    1. If you want to do some harmonics, switch your pickup and take the one with higher tone. Then go and put your gain at 100%. If your amp has "EQ" with LOW MID HIGH or similars, you should try my settings. If you want a metal tone: Low at 25%, MID 50% and HIGH 75%. Rock one: LOW 25%, MID 75%, HIGH 50%. Espero que et serveixi d'algo :)

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    2. This all depends on the amp and shit you know. What I personally recommend is that first of all, when practising, ditch ALL the effects you use that can hide mistakes and all that shit. I mean all the delays and reverbs and such. They sound good live and on the recordings, but when practising you want your tone to be PAINFULLY clear. Too much distortion tends to make you sound muddy as well, but of course if rock/metal guitar and shredding is your thing then you're gonna need some. If you want to practise natural or artificial harmonics then it helps to dial up the distortion a bit, but not too much. If you can pull those off with a mild distortion you can make your guitar squeal like a pig when when you have your "rock-god" sound :)

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    3. Luis (Pickboy from Barcelona)August 20, 2012 at 11:50 PM

      Readed and got it! I never ditched the effects before playing. Ill put in practice this stuff you told me. Thanks a lot :)

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  12. This is really cool dude. Thanks for taking then time to help us out! :D

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  13. Jani I thank you for these excercises they have helped me alot also what is your current electric guitar that u find yourself playing the most Ty men!

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  14. I saw many times the young guitar videos with your ideas and i amazed with your sweep picking. How long you practice that technique?

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  15. Jani,PLEASE RESPOND TO THIS! On the The world forgotten the words forbidden solo,what kind of effect do you use? It sounds really cool! Also,what inspired this solo? Because it sounds kinda 80's and Pink Floydish,and i want to hear more of those type of solos!In fact,i'm dying to hear more of this style of solos!!!

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    1. I have absolutely no clue what you are talking about...?

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    2. I mean the little acoustic solo on the song "The worlds forgotten the words forbidden" from Unia,what type of effects do you use there? And what influenced that solo? because it sounds really diverse from your previous solos.It sounds really 80's and kinda dreamy,if you know what i mean.Hope you understand now :)

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  16. Hey J-li i need some advice for tapping those string skipping arps.
    How do you get your hand from the pickups upto the fretboard so fast this is really frustrating.
    Any tips would be appreciated thanks.

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  17. Yo,

    you need to have your picking hand already closer to the fretboard, kinda hard to explain... On this Young Guitar video I play something similar around 01:11, hope that helps.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dz3hpwKTB3I

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  18. Hey Jani! I heard the Words forbidden worlds forgotten acoustic solo and i have to agree with the guy who asked that it sounds different from your other solos,from where did you draw inspiration for that one?

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    1. Ookey, you guys are not going to believe this...

      First of all, I didn't remember how that song even goes, I had no clue. I remembered it was short and kind of strange and thought it had no solo. Well, I went to youtube to listen to it, and sure enough, there is this very short acoustic solo.

      Well, second of all, I didn't remember playing any acoustic on "Unia", so I thought it was the guy who played acoustic guitar and bunch of other stringed instruments on "Unia", Peter Engberg.

      BUT, when thinking about this I couldn't for the death of me remember what his name was, so I went to wikipedia to find out. Well, turns out it IS actually me playing that solo, apparently I did play acoustic guitar on 2 tracks. Now that I listen to it, it definitely sounds like me, it has many of the melodic ideas I use a lot. This probably speaks volumes about in what kind of mental state I was in while recording that album...

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    2. Wow,i would kill to hear similar solos,not by you neceserry but in general,this kind of acoustic slow rock type of soloing which i can't find anywhere that sounds similar to that solo! :P I also noticed that on Unia,the solos have a Kirk Hammett influence,am i right? Because of the 2 string bends,also on 2006 shows you used similar bends on solos.Really cool stuff man!

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    3. wow guy, that shows that you are really talent, although you weren´t well at all, you did incredible things! BTW... in the last lesson you forgot to mention something: USE THE FUCKING METRONOME!!! ;S haha!!!

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  19. I was watching some guitar lessons and exercises and one guy said that using drum machine is much better than a metronome. And I think it really is, because once you form a band, you're not going to be playing with a metronome. You'll be playing with a drummer. I feel that drum machine brings authenticity. But I don't so I'm posting this.

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    1. Andy James said that,right?

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    2. Luis (Pickboy from Barcelona)August 25, 2012 at 1:37 AM

      To Traveler In time. Is a good option to use the drums when you play in a band cause a Metronome in that context is near useless, but the metronome is the best option in my opinion cause youre practising and building technique. To practise, u need the metronome to make your licks precise and have a reference when youre just practising. When practising I think you dont need much autenticity. Just a tic tic tic tic and effects off thar could hide mistakes, and then get a Petrucci way of play. And then, a nice drumsto play in your band and your nice aqquired precisr tech.

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  20. FUCKING METRONOME!!!!

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  21. Well Jani can you tell some cool metal settings you like to use or something that can make awesome metal/power metal sound :))

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    1. It depends on your gear dude :) Just use your ears, that's what I do as I really know shit about the equipment :)

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  22. hello jani, could you give me an opinion of my cover from your solo?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SF3AbAQcMzI
    i really like altaria and i play everyday at least one song, i started to play the guitar like 5 years ago, could you give me an advice? thank u and good luck.

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    1. Great job dude! I obviously have nothing more to show -> I'll get mi coat :)

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  23. Have you ever though about making guitar lessons?

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  24. Hey Jani, how it's going? Today I have a few more questions, could you help me, please? :)
    -Which effect do you use with your pedal, I'm just curious because I want to get a powerful sound from my guitar and yours is awesome.
    -You said that some effects can hide a few mistakes, and my BIGGEST mistake is hitting another string usually doing string skipping arpeggios excercices. With distorsion this sounds awful. Any advice?
    Thank you Jani! You're the best.

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    1. As for the first question, I don't use any pedals or effects or whatnot, have not used in years. Good guitar+good amp=epic win, it's very meat&potatoes setup, but that's the way I like it. On the albums there are some effects, but they've been added when doing the mix.

      As for the second question: Practise :) I know it might not be the advice you want to hear, but there's really no other way around it.

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    2. Just what I wanted to hear, today I asked my guitar teacher and told me the same, but I wanted your opinion so, thank you Jani!:)

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  25. Hey there Jani, could you make a lesson where you explain the use of modes? :)

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    1. I recommend using a google and finding a good article about them, or -if you want to do it the old-fashioned way like I did- a trip to your local library. There are a LOT of people who can explain them to you better than I can :)

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  26. jani what is your present in your pod? amp mod mic cabs EQ??? :)

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    1. To be honest, I have no clue :) I just keep twisting the knobs until I hear something that sounds decent. Let your ears be your guide :)

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  28. Jani Could you talk about guitar effects? I have a Pod HD 400. there any combination that you recommend me to get a good distortion?

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    1. I have never used that thingy you mention, and as I've told before, I don't really use any effects. Sorry for not being more helpful here, but it's really not my cup of tea...

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  29. Hey Jani, could you upload some tabs to Morpheus in a Masquerade? Specificaly 2:02 - 2:22. That shit's killing me.

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    1. Thanks Jani! (same guy who asked for the tabs here!)

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    2. Btw, I just found out that trying to play it on E-Standard was the apparent reason to my failure, haha! Thanks again!

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    3. Jani in E? It rhymes, but it's preposterous! :p

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  30. Jani, many young people like me who like to know how we started composing your music. I am with all the energy and entuciasmo composing, but my mind go blank, any advice?

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  31. what type of guitar and amps do you prefer to use i like marshall, mesa boogie and engl and i play ibanez rg's

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  32. Hey Jani, do you have some tips for me about writing songs?
    Every time I got something i get stuck. Is there some kind of order you should use when writing?

    greetings from Holland

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    1. Dude, this is a very difficult question. I have no actual formula or process that I use to write songs. I just sit down and start noodling around with the keyboards or the guitar or sit in front of the computer and try to make something that sounds interesting to me. All I can say is stick with it, and if you get stuck start working on another idea or go do something totally different and come back to the original idea later, sometimes having fresh ears gives you more perspective.

      I would actually like to write some thoughts down about songwriting, but the truth is that I just start fucking around until something sounds good, or sometimes I have an idea already playing in my head and I just need to get it down before I forget it.

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  33. hey jani loved your acoustic album glad i bought it something else to listen to other then metal hope to see more stuff in the future

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  34. Hey Jani! I'm so happy I found this blog since you're the reason I started playing guitar, cheers!
    Just wanted to say keep up the fantastic work please and I might ask a question later ;)

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  35. Luis (Pickboy From Barcelona)February 13, 2013 at 9:29 PM

    Hey Jani ! First of all, thanks for transcribe the songs :) ! But I'd love you to transcribe "Revontulet", and/or "Weballergy" solos.

    Could you?

    Thanks a lot =)

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  36. thanks for blinded no more solo Jani! :)

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  37. Hey guys, I saw that some people were asking for "the boy who wanted to be a real puppet" solo tab, so I share the one I made some times ago : http://ekladata.com/alexis11.eklablog.com/perso/the%20boy%20who%20wanted%20to%20be%20a%20real%20puppet%20solo.pdf

    I'm not 100% sure that the fingering is the exact same as Jani did, but at leat I'm pretty convinced that the notes are good :)

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  38. Please do the weballergy solo jani!! :D

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  39. Hi Jani,can you give me some advice about my cover of your solo of fullmoon If you have so time to kill :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Z3D2BdYZbI&list=UU_s1lT4lNRXYPr_T6XfEbrg&index=1

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  40. Hi Jani,

    Can you give me any tips for playing A. harmonics?

    Greetings from Chile!

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  41. do you use G-strings? xD

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  43. Hello Jani !

    Well, I'd like to request you when you get some time, some advices to play the song "Revontulet", as the intro is fkckng insane, and can't really go to the next step.

    Kiitos paljon !

    Pickboy From Barcelona

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  44. Terve Jani!

    It seems to me the Blinded no more solo is quite different from the studio version. Is the posted one a more preferred approach, more to your liking?

    Thanks in advanve and vittu saatana!

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  45. Jani, could you tab out the intro of 13th Disciple? I would really appreciate it.

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  46. Could you do a lesson on tapping?

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  47. Hey Jani, could you maybe do Where My Rainbow Ends or My Selene? Would really love it. And a million thanks to you for all the inspiration, started playing guitar just this year because of you so thanks a bunch, really love playing it.

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  48. Jani, in the world there are many fans who follow your work , too am a fan of what you do. I like your way of playing, Sonata Arctica if lack you are no longer the same. now it's just a band without a soul, you could share your sheet music of sonata arctica, topics in which you participated (until Unia album). you said that beginners should play the songs that we like, I like sonata arctica topics in which you participated. You were my first influence in the metal and guitar, greetings from Chile.

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  49. Hi, if you still take requests, I would like to learn the solo to the Boy who wanted to be real puppet. Thank you!

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  50. Jani,

    I'm so happy that I found this blog. I'm even happier to find out that you're still active. You're my favorite guitarist of all time and constantly come up in metal conversations with friends. Thank you for all these exercises they're golden. Question: During your solo on "Black Sheep" there's an ascending run that starts out on the 12th fret of the A string (A note). Is there any way that you could post that as an exercise one day? I've been trying to learn it by ear for months but you play the lick very fast! Most of the internet tabs / guitar pro files seem to be bullshit. I wanna hear the truth from the man himself!

    \m/ Rock on! \m/
    -Josh
    Cleveland, OH, USA

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  51. Janni ive been a great fan of you since I was 9 ( 19 now)... I should have come to this page before, I really really admire you guitar skills (you are one of the fastest ive known,) an you still manage to have a lot of soul in your solos ( something I miss this days)... I wish you could tell me how many hours you studied when younger ( Im studying in a music school but i kind of suck because i started late so i need special education, but im really dedicated).....
    I wish I could meet you someday in my musician road....You have done so many for me with out knowing (and probably so many people).... you inspire me!! hope to get a studying tips from you.... by the way I love your transcriptions and it would be awesome if you did more of your solos ( weballergy is my fav :D)

    well janni I wish you the best you dont know how much I wish you to be happy and well... cheers from chile!

    (you are the poet music, lyrics wise and with your guitar solos :D)

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  52. Hi Jani, You used string skipping in the song "in black and white" so, would you upload a tab of that solo? I found a guitar pro tab but the part which is next to the string skiping it's still confusing for me. Thanks and greetings from Peru!

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  53. A great HELLO from France Jani ! Endless thanks about your patience and tutorial on this blog ! Hope one day shaking your hand and having some drink with you in Kemi... or why not in Strasbourg, the place where I live ? :D

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  54. Hello Jani me gusta tu disco me gusta el tema when my raibow ends. la voz de Timo es hermosa ..ojala vinieran a Buenos Aires.
    saludos Mika.
    .

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  55. Hi Jani!
    First of all thank you for these great exercises.
    But I'm confused about string skipping arpeggios.
    Should I pick the every note on the Pachelbel's and Gilbert's licks or should I hammer/pull some of it?

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  56. more sweep picking in standard tuning plz :D

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  57. Jani in Sweepd from Young Guitar HQ

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVKCDWA_rxo

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